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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
view of jesus in america. we'll ask the author of american stephen broth row with another view on the live line. captions produced by visual audio captioning www.visualaudiocaptioning.com barack obama barac barack obama barack obama >> dr. stephen prothero, welcome. your book has a ctral proposition, what is the proposition in the book? >> i think there's two. one is that jesus is many and mal oohable, there isn't just one jesus but there's many and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began
of the tragedy. stephen brock is a professor of school psyologat cifora ste university in cramto. he's a member of an emergency assistance team for the national association of school psychologists. dewey cornell is director of the youth violence project at the university of virginia. he is a forensic clinical psychologist. we hope to be joined by mo canady is the executive director of the national association of school resource officials, which works on school based policing and security. for now i wan to welcome both stephenrock a dewey cornell. i will start with you stephen brock. you've dealt with this sort of thing before. what was your reaction when you heard this today? >> well, as a school psychologist, as a father, as a person who is no stranger to this kind of loss t was quite simply devastating. just a very sad day. >> warner: and dewey cornell. >> terrible tragedy and very frustrating that we weren't able to prevent this. >> let me stay with you, dewey cornell, you have as he said worked with this sort of thig. peop look at tis and ink how could it happen. what do you say when your f
a screen play. 500 pages long. i gave it to stephen. stephen is always surprising. after he read the first 150 pages, he said, i love this. i'll read the rest of it, but this is a movie. i thought, that's great to hear, but you can't make -- it's the first movie about abraham lincoln in 72 years except for the vampire killer thing. you can't make the fist movie about lincoln about the passage of the 13th amendment. hardly anybody knows how that happened. stephen just kept coming back to that saying, that's the exciting thing. he said when he first read it, he said, i knew that the amendment passed, but i sat there wondering if it was going to pass when i was watching the vote. >> he is clearly one of the most methologized figures in all of history. here you and stephen spielberg come trying to put flesh and blood back into this icon. was there a moment when you suddenly saw into the character, saw what you were looking at to make the man come alive? >> yeah, there were a couple. one was a letter that seward wrote to his wife fanny. >> secretary of state, lincoln's chief adviser. >> and chi
and secury. for now i want to welcome both stephen brock and dewey cornell. i will start with you stephen brock. you've dealt with this sort of thing before. what was your reaction when you heard this today? >> well, as a school psychologist, as a father, as a person who is no stranger to this kind of loss t was quite simply devastating. just a very sad day. >> warner: and dewey cornell. >> terrible tragedy and very frustrating that we weren't able to prevent this. >> let me stay with you, dewey cornell, you have as he said wked wi this sort of thing. people look at this and think how could it happen. what do you say when your friends, your colleagues, people who know the work you do, how do you answer that question? >> well, the first thing i try to point out is that calling this a school shooting is a bit of a misnomer. it is a mass shotting that happened to occur in a school. schools are very safe places. we know objectively that students are safer in school than almost anyplace else. but what's really critical is to understand the relationship between the shooter and the victims. we l
business. stephen roell of johnson controls joins us. >> reporter: pfizer took a big hit this year when its blockbuster cholesterol drug lipitor came off patent. still ahead, the outlook for the generic drug business in 2013. >> susie: on wall street today, another triple-digit gain in blue chip stocks on hopes that a fiscal cliff deal is in the works. investors were also reassured by another positive report from the housing sector. homebuilder cfidence hit its highest level since the spring of 2006. but the housing recovery still has a ways to go: index readings above 50 reflect a positive outlook. some encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bo
.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from m stdpoit, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for the next three years. the question is what it will do, depending on what the outcome is, how is it going to alter my strategies if the out come is different than i thought. >> susie: higher taxes is going to be a part of any deal. >> right. >> susie: are you open to higher taxes? how does it impact your business? >> i'm open to it. but i'm conc
exposure therapy. >> comfortable. >> yes. >> you can hear me. >>es. >> stephen king was there the day to the we ares fell. and he's been dealing with it ever since. >> i had a, just such a total feeling that i wasn't the same person. >> like many other rescue workers king has post traumatic stress disorder. he's been through therapy but it didn't work. so now he's trying this virtual therapy. >> i was almost shaking. i mean it brought it back like i was there again watching it. >> it's called virtual reality therapy or vrt. and it uses sounds and 3 d images to force patients to face their fears. >> very slowly patients are taken back to their traumatic experiences. and steven's case, a virtual journey back to september 11th. >> here's how it works. first the patient sees the towers as they were before the attacks. then a plane appears and flies behind to the percent. experts say this readies the patient for what is about to happen. next a plane hits the first tower but without sound. then the fullxperience authentic pictures and surrounds taken from video shot that dayment because it
and parent of two children, stephen brock. get ankery look at our coming story. a special correspondent profiles an indian politician who is both loved and loathed. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and to a different kind of honor roll tonight, of those killed in newtown, connecticut, on friday morning. as we've reported, there were 20 first-graders and six women in the school, plus the mother of the shooter, who lost their lives. here, in silence, are the names of the 27 victims. 25 photographs were available. first, the children in alphabetical order. >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll update the connecticut story, and talk with west virginia senator joe manchin. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation fo
were talking about stephen crane and conrad. the writers' room which can be one of the great places of creativity in america, a writers' room on a good show. listen. we were all at various stages of having dropped out english departments one way or another. that's how you get to los angeles. the subject of dickens was always coming up. we were writing about cities, writing about crimes, writing about crops. dickens was one of the first people to notice how interesting a policeman is standing between the legitimate and the ill lee might jat in a city. the conversation turned off as a popular writer, we're writing for televisio so was he. when he talk about the fact that people... when simon talked about the fact that the weekly part would be read allowed to others in the family living room by dad it resembles nothing so much as an american family gathered around a character set with undischarged energy. the great thing is that you then have to master it. unlike shakespea. must allow the character to pen great into your soul as it were. with dickens you have to hang to mrs. gamp if yo
to go along, because-- as americas cup ceo stephen barclay said-- the rewards in jobs and money would be substantial. the america's cup coming to a city is all about the economics. and san francisco did its own numbers, and they said that its going to bring $1.4 billion worth of economic benefit here and 9,000 jobs. >> reporter: but a disappointed san francisco mayor ed lee announced that the agreement and the promise of many of those jobs was going by the boards, after cup organizers decided that developing the pier would cost too much. still, the city and oracle went ahead with race plans. others were relieved; they saw the arrangement with ellison as a giveaway of city property. and still others feared environmental consequences of too many visitors and non- recreational uses of waterfront land. then there was the matter of boats: originally, organizers thought up to 15 72-foot boats could compete. but they cost millions, and in the midst of a worldwide recession, only four of them, plus elison's, decided to take part. nobody is suggesting the race will be a bust, but the prospects
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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